The big clubs want Premier League reform so that the number of teams will be reduced to 18. The ‘Big Six will make decisions’. In return, small clubs are promised finances.

The English press, in particular the Telegraph, published a Premier League reform project developed by Manchester United and Liverpool. This idea is under discussion for a long time; however, the crisis caused by the coronavirus and the reduction of finances forced the big clubs to take a radical step. According to the project, the control of the Premier League is exactly the so-called Will be in the hands of the ‘Big Six’.

The most important change is that the ‘Big Six’ and three other traditional teams (West Ham, Southampton, Everton) should be given special status. Until now, any decision in the Premier League needed the consent of 14 of its 20 participating clubs. Now it will be enough to have the sum of 6 of these 9 teams with special status. That is, not really the majority, but 6 teams will decide how the Premier League will develop. The rest, small teams, will be the only invited guests to the big teams’ tournament.

 

The number of teams must change

 

Eighteen teams will play in the Premier League. This change, too, naturally harms the interests of smaller teams. They’ll have less chance to get a place in the Premier League. There are plans to cancel the League Cup and Super Cup. This change is also in the interests of big teams. Due to the busy schedule, they have too many games, and this is the reason for wanting changes.

According to the project, the system of redistribution of funds should be changed, and it will be calculated not only according to the last season but also according to the last 3 seasons. This is also in the interests of great teams. Even with 1 season thrown in, they will have a guarantee that their income will not change.

In return, they will develop a support package for small clubs affected by the virus. The English Football Association will receive 250 million to help lower league teams and defer a quarter of its revenue each year to the Premier League for smaller teams.

The crisis and the lack of spectators have primarily affected small clubs as spectators are a major source of income for them. The big clubs are also taking advantage of this moment and promise help in times of crisis in exchange for giving up their rights and handing over the management of the Premier League to the big clubs alone. This is how the essence of these changes can be assessed.

It is symbolic that the American owners of Manchester and Liverpool are at the head of this project. They want the Premier League to be similar to the American sports leagues. Big clubs support this idea, but the English Football Association does not like it. It yet unknown what he will do after leaving the post.