The showroom is set to begin on June 11, with the final being played a month later on July 11. Almost correctly 12 months after UEFA set the original dates.

Euro 2020 officially suspended until 2021

Euro 2020 has officially suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic, and now the tournament should be held in the summer of 2021. The showroom is set to begin on June 11, with the final being played a month later on July 11. Almost correctly 12 months after UEFA set the original dates. With Euro 2020 now a year before the event, we looked at what it would mean for the tournament and how it had already affected the football calendar in 2021. Despite UEFA’s confirmation of the postponement of dates to 2021 in March. The organization confirmed that they had not yet accepted the decision. On the name of the tournament after a tweet, which, it would seem, was sent out by mistake.

UEFA tweeted mistakenly

The tweet read: “CONFIRMED: Although it will be temporarily held from June 11 – July 11, 2021, it will still be known as UEFA EURO 2020.” However, just a few minutes later, the tweet was deleted, and another tweet was posted, which reads: “With apologies for the previous mistake. To be clear until a decision is made on the name of the reorganized EURO, which will be held in 2021.” The reason for the delay in deciding by UEFA is most likely commercial since marketing and advertising materials will all be riddled with EURO 2020. Even a simple change is expected to be expensive, not to mention changing the name of the entire tournament.

Celebrating 60 years since the first European Championship

There may be an aspect of integrity, as the idea of ​​several cities around Europe hosting Euro 2020. To celebrate 60 years since the first European Championship, which took place in France for only four days. While the tournament, of course, goes forward in 2021 for reasons beyond UEFA’s control. Retaining the name as Euro 2020 will allow them to keep it as a 60-year celebration of Euro 1960. Another UEFA concern, perhaps, is that renaming the tournament to Euro 2021 could undermine a female colleague who has already been rescheduled to make room for the men’s publication.