The Spanish champions were one of 12 clubs to announce the start of the Super League over the weekend, only to see it collapse amid a furious fan backlash.

According to Perez, the clubs can’t leave the Super League

Real Madrid president Florentino Perez argued that the European Super League is not dead, insisting that its members stay where they are, although many have announced their intention to leave. The Spanish champions were one of 12 clubs to announce the start of the Super League over the weekend, only to see it collapse amid a furious fan backlash. The first to leave the Premier League clubs, and Perez, claiming one of them, “infected” the rest, but the Madrid chef does not think that the plans for a new competition are now in tetters. Despite disappointment with the failure of the Super League, Perez keeps the competition alive by warning that contracts are binding and that it will be resurrected. “I’m not going to explain now what a binding contract is,” Perez told reporters. “But the clubs can’t leave.”

UEFA’s proposals don’t address the issues facing football at the moment

“Some of them had to say because of the pressure that they were leaving. But this project or one like it will continue, and I hope it’s soon. The Super League is still there, and the members are still in it. We have now given ourselves a few weeks to reflect as we face the violence that some persons who do not want to lose their privileges have used to manipulate our project.” Amid the Super League furore, UEFA announced changes to the Champions League – with an expanded format set to come into play in the 2024-25 season. Perez argued that UEFA’s proposals do not address the issues facing football at the moment and warned that clubs could face bankruptcy unless changes are made soon. “The Super League does not go against the domestic competition, and its goal is to have more money for all sections of football,” he said.

“The concept is to generate more interest in the games. I also don’t think that UEFA changes’ are a real solution to the problem because what has been proposed is not even an improvement on the current model. Also, we can’t wait until 2024. But in any case, we must have done poorly. We’re going to try to turn that around and come up with more ideas. Maybe the solution is for the top four teams in each league to play. The truth is, no. Not a format that nobody understands, not a time frame, because by 2024. Either we fix this before, or all the clubs go bankrupt.”