Italy inability to fit the bill for World Cup for the second time ever after Sweden hang on in San Siro stalemate

Italian football endured one of its most prominent fiascos as the national side passed up an excellent opportunity for the World Cup finals without precedent for a long time.

In spite of persevering weight and limitless shots, the Azzurri neglected to topple the 1-0 shortage from the first leg, diving the football-frantic country into outrage and gloom.

November 13, 2017, will go down in ignominy as one of its darkest evenings.

In the transient national coach, Gian Piero Ventura will probably be sacked, and unbelievable goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon will resign.

Italy fail to qualify for the world cup

In any case, the shock waves will resound all over the nation, whose national group has been a fixture at 14 successive finals and has won the World Cup four times. They are required to qualify as a flat out absolute minimum.

Ventura’s side, toothless in the main leg, carved out chances to soften the halt up the San Siro, however, a blend of misfortune, terrible finishing and roused defending denied them.

On the bright side, today a confused, distrusting country is awakening to the possibility of watching Russia 2018 without the favorite blue shirts of Italy.

Interestingly the Swedish side that some way or another kept Italy under control have turned out to be instant national legends.

In the wake of charm Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s retirement Swedish football was believed to confront decrease, but, instead, JanneAndersson’s men have cut their place in old national stories.

“I’m not sorry for myself but all of Italian football,” said Buffon.

“We failed at something which also means something on a social level. There’s regret at finishing like that, not because time passes.

“Those who’ve played know how hard these matches are. We weren’t able to express ourselves at our best.

“We lacked the composure to score. Play-offs are decided by episodes, and they went against us, but you can understand that when you’re at fault.

“We have pride, strength and we’re stubborn. We know how to get back up again as we’ve always done.

“I’m leaving an Italy side that will know how to speak for itself. Hugs to everyone, especially those I’ve shared this wonderful journey with.

“Blame is shared equally among everyone. There can’t be scapegoats. Win together, lose together.”

As kick-off moved toward the white-hot climate in the San Siro mirrored the high stakes, despite the fact that the crowd took their enthusiasm too far by shrieking the Swedish national anthem.

Ventura’s side begun emphatically with Southampton’s Manolo Gabbiadini banding together Ciro Immobile in an attack.

Italy fail to qualify for the first time since 1959

However, in spite of the early pressure, they thought that its challenging to make clear shots.

The Italians managed to cut the Swedish defense open in the 27th minute when a dazzling lobbed pass from Jorginho found Immobile in space on the left.

He cut it back crosswise over the goal, and it fell to Antonio Candreva, whose exertion skimmed the highest point of the crossbar.

Five minutes from half-time Immobile got on the end of another lovely Jorginho pass and beat Swedish keeper Robin Olsen, just for Granqvist to return clear.

It looked as though the Swedes’ brave protection was going to split under strain, and Alessandro Florenzi had another transcendent shot just before half-time yet Olsen spared splendidly to save the 0-0 scoreline.

The second half opened with another claim for a penalty – this time when right-back Mikael Lustig’s knee connected with Darmian’s ribcage – however again referee Lahoz was unaffected.

In the 53rd minute, Florenzi again came close, this time with an acrobatic volley from the edge of the 18-yard box.

The Swedes appeared to have assuaged the Italian risk and even had a modest bunch of half opportunities to themselves.

However, in the 87th minute, El Shaarawy smashed in a volley that was very well saved, once more, by Olsen.

As the match ticked over into added time, the Italians ended up plainly edgy, and Buffon pulled his maturing body upfield for their last two corners.

However, it was all futile, and when the ref blew for the time, the Azzurri players fell on the turf as a crescendo of boos rang around the San Siro. The unfathomable had happened.

“We had no weapons left,” said Sweden coach Jan Andersson.

“We just had to sit there and hope that we could hang on.

“We couldn’t do it in any other way; they are so skillful.”